Topics covered in this chapter include
  • Practical and in-class considerations
  • Private vs public sites
  • Backups
  • Student backups
  • Use of cookies and monitoring
  • Help and support available via social media services
  • Help and support available at school
  • Cross-platform and cross-browser functionality/usability
  • School bandwidth quotas
  • Students’ home internet access
  • Requiring students to register
  • Choice of service
  • Student identification and usernames
  • Students’ responsibility for work done under their own login details
  • Visibility of students’ work to each other
  • Preventing changes being made to the site after the due date
  • Posting of offensive material
  • Student user roles
  • Student administrators of class sites
  • Assessment
  • Including parents

For more detail, read Chapter 8 of Using Social Media in the Classroom. A best practice guide.

Practical and in-class considerations
  • Private vs public sites: What level of privacy is best for your project?
  • Backups: Can you back up your site yourself? Do students have any responsibility for this?
  • Use of cookies and monitoring: Can you turn these off? If so, how?
  • Help and support available via social media services: What is available in this area? Is it adequate?
  • Help and support available at school: Will your school IT people help out?
  • Cross-platform and cross-browser functionality/usability: Does the service you have chosen work across Mac and PC and across browsers?
  • School bandwidth quotas: Will these affect your use of social media in the classroom?
  • Students’ home internet access: Do they have it? Will you disadvantage those students who do not have access?
  • Requiring students to register: You simply shouldn't. Do you need to find another task for students/parents who do not wish to register to complete?
  • Choice of service: Can students choose their own? If so, under what conditions?
  • Student identification and usernames: Can you balance anonymity with the need as a teacher to know who is making which contributions?
  • Students’ responsibility for work done under their own login details: Do students understand how this works?
  • Visibility of students’ work to each other: Is this appropriate?
  • Preventing changes being made to the site after the due date: How will you control this?
  • Posting of offensive material: How will you control this?
  • Student user roles: What level of access is it appropriate for students to have?
  • Student administrators of class sites: Should students be allowed to site admins?
  • Assessment: How will you use these tools in assessment?



Sites, applications, and tools

Further reading
  • Hope, A. (2013) The shackled school internet: zemiological solutions to the problem of over-blocking, Learning, Media and Technology, 38(3), pp. 270–283.
  • Lenhart, A., Madden, M., Cortesi, S., Gasser, U., and Smith, A. (2013) Where teens seek online privacy advice. Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2013/PIP_TeensandPrivacyAdvice.pdf.
  • Education Review. (2011) Pirates in the playground, Education Review, 8 February 2011.