Topics covered in this chapter include
  • What are bookmarking, mindmapping, clippings, and polls?
  • Bookmarking
  • Pintrest
  • Mind mapping
  • Polls and surveys
  • Educational benefits of bookmarking, clippings, mindmapping, and polls
  • Bookmarking: Collating, organising, and sharing information
  • Mind mapping: Visualising ideas and problems
  • Pintrest: Evaluating and synthesising online materials
  • Polls and surveys: Research and critical media skills
  • Special considerations for bookmarking, clippings, mindmapping, and polls
  • Inappropriate content
  • Mind mapping skills

For more detail, read Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom. A best practice guide.
Social bookmarking basics
  • Keep your bookmarks/favourites on the web, instead of on your computer.
  • Access your bookmarks from any computer with an internet connection.
  • Share your bookmarks and tags with others using RSS.
  • Search other people’s bookmarks instead of using Google.
  • Bookmarking services let you link directly to the resource you have bookmarked.
  • Resources are tagged, rather than put in folders. This means you can access a resource in several different ways — not just by finding it in the specific folder you saved it to.
  • People can use RSS to subscribe to all your bookmarks, or to single tags.


Social bookmarking is suitable for
  • Communication and knowledge sharing
  • Information seeking, searching, and consolidation
  • Object sharing
  • Presentation and dissemination of information
  • Storing and managing information

Special considerations
  • See Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom for special considerations regarding student use of social bookmarking, including issues relating to inappropriate content

Handouts, checklists, and planning materials
What is social bookmarking?
Social bookmarking FAQ for students.
  • What is social bookmarking?
  • What are tags?
  • What is the difference between bookmarks and favourites?
  • OK, I've saved a site ... now what?
  • Can I group my bookmarks into broader categories or bundles?
  • Can I keep my bookmarks private?
  • How else can I use social bookmarking in my study?


Ideas for use with your class
  • Ask students to start up their own bookmarking account. Use a unique tag that identifies your class and aggregate the group’s links on a certain topic. Tell students to find and save links and resources and to justify their choices by using the ‘Notes’ field for the link they have tagged.
  • Use your own bookmarking account to create bundles of tags based around class topics or weeks. Post links to your account and use the ‘Notes’ function to give students instructions. e.g., Tell students to visit the websites found under ‘Week 1.’ Then ask them to comment on the three most important things they learnt from the site.
  • Send your students to your own bookmarks website. It’s a good way for you to model how you work and for students to see what resources you are compiling for your own research or teaching.
  • Create annotated resources lists for group projects.
  • There are more ideas for use with your class in Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom.

Further reading



Mindmapping basics
  • Create mindmaps online.
  • Share your mindmaps with others.
  • Embed your mindmap in your blog, wiki or other website.
  • Drop and drag bubbles into the centre of the screen.
  • Link bubbles to each other.
  • Use the menu to export your mindmap to your blog or website, or to save it as a picture file.

Mindmapping is suitable for
  • Analysis, synthesis, evaluation
  • Brainstorming
  • Collaboration
  • Communication and knowledge sharing
  • Comprehension and knoweldge building
  • Opinion building and sharing
  • Presentation and dissemination of information
  • Visualisation

Special considerations

Using Bubbl.us
Using Debategraph


Using Cacoo


Using Wallwisher



Ideas for use with your class
  • Ask student to collaborate on building a mindmap or debate map of a class topic. Get them to explain their map to the rest of the class.
  • Use Bubbl.us to map out your class topics for students. This is a great way of showing how material in your syllabus connects and can be a great conceptual aid for students. Embed your map in your class website.
  • There are more ideas for use with your class in Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom.

Visit Hamish’s Wallwisher




Polls and surveys basics
  • Create and customise polls
  • Share your polls with others
  • Ask students to create polls on class topics and insert them into their wikis or blogs etc.

Polls and surveys are suitable for
  • Brainstorming
  • Communication and knowledge sharing
  • Comprehension and knowledge building
  • Feedback
  • Information seeking, searching, and consolidation
  • Opinion building and sharing

Special considerations
  • See Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom for special considerations regarding student use of polls and surveys, including issues relating to inappropriate content

Ideas for use with your class
  • Ask students to create a poll for a class investigation. Get them to collate their results and to present a report.
  • Use polls to demonstrate to students how survey questions can be used to manipulate opinion. The classic dialogue from ‘Yes, Prime Minister’ about opinion polls and introduction of national service can be a great starting point. Ask students to construct a poll that deliberately biases each side of an argument.
  • Create your own poll and use it as a quizz to check student understanding of a topic.
  • Use a poll to gather student feedback on your teaching or your course.
  • Teach students how to create meaningful poll questions around course themes.
  • Use polls as a way of gathering opinion or information for your own research.
  • There are more ideas for use with your class in Chapter 15 of Using Social Media in the Classroom.



Further reading
  • Edwards, G. and Mosley, B. F. (2011) Technology integration can be delicious: social bookmark- ing as a technology integration tool, in C. Wankel (ed.), Educating Educators with Social Media (Cutting-edge Technologies in Higher Education, Vol. 1), Bradford: Emerald Group Publishing Limited. pp. 207–25.
  • Harrison, C. (2011) Literacy, technology and the internet: what are the challenges and opportunities for learners with reading difficulties, and how do we support them in meeting those challenges and grasping those opportunities? in C. Wyatt-Smith, J. Elkins and S. Gunn (eds), Multiple Perspectives on Difficulties in Learning Literacy and Numeracy. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands. pp. 111–31.
  • Holloway, D., Green, L., and Livingstone, S. (2013). Zero to eight: young children and their internet use. London: LSE, EU Kids Online. Retrieved from http://www.lse.ac.uk/media@lse/research/EUKidsOnline/EU%20Kids%20III/PDFs/Zero_to_eight.pdf.
  • Krauss, J. (2012) Infographics: more than words can say, Learning & Leading with Technology, 39(5), pp. 10–14.
  • Lamb, G. R., Polman, J. L., Newman, A., and Smith, C. G. (2014) Science news infographics: teaching students to gather, interpret, and present information graphically, The Science Teacher, 81(3).
  • Mihailidis, P. and Cohen, J. N. (2013) Exploring curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education, Journal of Interactive Media in Education. Retrieved from http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/article/2013-02/pdf.
  • Wang, W-C., Lee, C-C., and Chu, Y-C. (2010) A brief review on developing creative thinking in young children by mind mapping, International Business Research, 3(3), 233–8.